6 MISTAKES CONSULTANTS KEEP MAKING




70% of consultancy services fail to understand the essence of keeping their clients happy and matching their expectations.


If your enthusiasm is not as much as you had when trying to win your client, you are not putting in the right amount of energy and commitment expected from you.

Here are 6 mistakes to avoid, which most consulting businesses commit while struggling to manage their client’s expectations.


BEHAVIOUR TRAP 1: LEAVING CLIENTS UNINFORMED

Clients expect regular updates on the project as they invest their money in your services and want to be updated and involved in the process. If you can’t do a daily follow-up, at least a weekly report must be sent to the client. Or, an online project plans the client can see as more regular the communication, the more comfortable the client will be and trust your methods.


BEHAVIOUR TRAP 2: DESSERTING CLIENTS MID-WAY

Some consultants work on multiple projects and then get swarmed with too much work all at once and desert their client’s mid-way or fail to keep them updated. Disorganised work styles may reflect that you don’t take your clients seriously and your service cannot be trusted.


BEHAVIOUR TRAP 3: NOT PLANNIING FOR CONTIGENCIES

An unexpected turn of events can occur, and you don’t want to deliver bad news to the client; therefore, setting aside a buffer time or a plan B shall give you flexibility and loss reversal strength. However, failing to have a contingency plan of action results in chaos and loss of resources for the amount of trust your clients put in you.


BEHAVIOUR TRAP 4: NOT BEING A GOOD LISTENER

Some clients have difficulty expressing what they want to accomplish, and this uncertainty is where careful listening can help. When you can’t identify what your clients want, it’s challenging to figure out key takeaways from that conversation.


BEHAVIOUR TRAP 5: OVER OR UNDERESTIMATING BUDGETS

Over or underestimating budget results in developing a dissonance between you and your client; as being an expert, you should have mapped the grey areas and set the budget accordingly and would reflect poor planning. Of course, you can’t predict the unprecedented times that affect the budget; in such cases inform your client immediately should be your ideal move.


The bottom line is that you have to be proactive in managing your client’s expectations. Failing to keep your client’s expectations in check will put you in a wrong spot and has the potential to disrupt your relationship.